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LSP 1101 : Research Strategies in Africana and Latino Studies
Crosslisted as: ASRC 1900, ASRC 1900 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The digital revolution has made an enormous amount of information available to research scholars, but discovering resources and using them effectively can be challenging. This course introduces students with research interests in Latino and Africana Studies to search strategies and methods for finding materials in various formats (e.g., digital, film, and print) using information databases such as the library catalog, print and electronic indexes, and the World Wide Web. Instructors provide equal time for lecture and hands-on learning. Topics include government documents, statistics, subject-specific online databases, social sciences, the humanities, and electronic citation management.
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LSP 1105 : Race and Ethnicity in the United States: Social Constructs, Real World Consequences
Crosslisted as: AMST 1104, SOC 1104 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will examine race and ethnic relations between Whites, Blacks, Latinos, and Asians in the United States. The goal of this course is for students to understand how the history of race and ethnicity in the U.S. affects opportunity structures in, for example, education, employment, housing, and health. Through this course students will gain a better understanding of how race and ethnicity stratifies the lives of individuals in the U.S.
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LSP 1321 : Music of Mexico and the Mexican Diaspora
Crosslisted as: AMST 1321, LATA 1321, MUSIC 1321, SPAN 1321 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This class is a survey of music practices among Mexican communities both in Mexico and in the U.S. Taking contemporary musical practices as a point of departure, the class explores the historical, cultural, and political significance of a wide variety of Mexican music traditions (including indigenous, folk, popular, and art music, dating back to the 16th Century) from a transnational perspective.
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LSP 1802 : Introduction to Latinos in U.S. History
Crosslisted as: AMST 1802, HIST 1802, LATA 1802 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How would our understanding of U.S. History change if we began the national narrative in 16th century New Mexico rather than 17th century Virginia? What does U.S. history look like when examined as part of a broader hemispheric history? What does U.S. history look like from the vantage point of the immigrant, the refugee and asylum seeker, the exile, transmigrante, and transnational?
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LSP 2010 : Latinos in the United States
Crosslisted as: AMST 2655, DSOC 2650, SOC 2650 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Exploration and analysis of the Hispanic experience in the United States. Examines the sociohistorical background and economic, psychological, and political factors that converge to shape a Latino group identity in the United States. Perspectives are suggested and developed for understanding Hispanic migrations, the plight of Latinos in urban and rural areas, and the unique problems faced by the diverse Latino groups. Groups studied include Mexican Americans, Dominicans, Cubans, and Puerto Ricans.
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LSP 2020 : Spanish for Heritage Speakers
Crosslisted as: SPAN 2000 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Designed to expand bilingual Heritage students' knowledge of Spanish by providing them with ample opportunities to develop and improve each of the basic language skills, with a particular focus on writing vocabulary. The heritage student has at least one parent of Hispanic origin and grew up speaking Spanish at home; s/he also finished high school here in the US. After this course students may take SPAN 2140, SPAN 2150, SPAN 2170, or SPAN 2095.
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LSP 2152 : (Im)migration and (Im)migrants: Then and Now
Crosslisted as: AMST 2152, GOVT 2152 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
One in ten residents of the United States was born outside the country. These people include international students, temporary workers, refugees, asylees, permanent residents, naturalized U.S. citizens and undocumented migrants. The arrival of these newcomers affects the cultural, economic, political and social dynamics of the country. Since immigration shows no signs of slowing down—in the United States or in many other nations of the world—the causes, consequences and repercussions of immigration will be one of the most important topics of the 21- century. Therefore this class will examine the history and contemporary role of immigration in the U.S. political system. The class will focus on two aspects of immigration: First, a historical examination of immigration policy from the founding of the country all the way forward to the current debate over immigration reform. Second, we will evaluate and assess the political incorporation and political participation of immigrant groups in the U.S. and determine whether immigrants are being incorporated, and if not, why? We will reflect on many important questions including the costs and benefits of immigration, issues related to civil rights and civil liberties, and finally propose our own ideas and solutions to the current immigration reform debate.
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LSP 2200 : Sociology of Health and Ethnic Minorities
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2200 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course discusses the health status of minorities in the United States. Explores intra-group diversity such as migration, economic status, and the influence of culture and the environment on the health status, access to health care and utilization of health services. Special attention to Latino and other minority populations.
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LSP 2201 : Perspectives on Latin America
Crosslisted as: LATA 2200, SPAN 2200 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Interdisciplinary course offered every spring. Topics vary by semester, but readings always focus on current research in various disciplines and regions of Latin America. The range of issues addressed include the economic, social, cultural, and political trends and transitions in the area. In the weekly meetings, instructors and guest lecturers facilitate student discussions. Students taking the course are required to participate in all class discussions and write a research paper in their chosen focus area.
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LSP 2212 : Caribbean Worlds
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2212, ENGL 2512 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This introductory course to the study of the Caribbean will begin with examinations of what constitutes the Caribbean and an understanding of Caribbean space.  We will then study its peoples, contact between Europeans and indigenous peoples, African enslavement and resistance, Indian indentureship and other forced migrations.  By mid semester we will identify a cross-section of leading thinkers and ideas. We will also pay attention to issues of identity, migration and the creation of the Caribbean diaspora. Constructions of tourist paradise and other stereotypes and the development of critical Caribbean institutions and national development will be discussed as we read and listen to some representative oral and written literature of the Caribbean and view some relevant film on the Caribbean. This inter-disciplinary survey provides students with a foundation for more specialized coursework on the Caribbean offered in our department.
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LSP 2251 : U.S. Immigration Narratives
Crosslisted as: AMST 2251, HIST 2251 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Americans are conflicted about immigration.  We honor and celebrate (and commercialize) our immigrant heritage in museums, folklife festivals, parades, pageants, and historical monuments. We also build fences and detention centers, and pass more and more laws to bar access to the United States. Polls tell us that Americans are concerned about the capacity of the United States to absorb so many immigrants from around the world. How often have we heard the laments "Today's immigrants are too different. They don't want to assimilate" or "My grandparents learned English quickly, why can't they?" The assumption is that older generations 'Americanized' quickly but that today's immigrants do not want to assimilate. Did 19th century immigrants really migrate to the United States to "become Americans"? Did they really assimilate quickly? Are today's immigrants really all that different from the immigrants who arrived earlier? Why do these particular narratives have such power and currency? This seminar will explore these issues and help students discern fact from fiction. 
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LSP 2300 : Cultures and Communities
Crosslisted as: LSP 4300 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Conceived as a service-learning course, the centerpiece here is targeted, engaged research and arts work with Latino/a culture-related organizations in Tompkins County like Cultura!,  No más lágrimas, and the Latino Civic Association.  The core idea is that students will learn while participating in meaningful activities that will enhance arts and culture partnerships.  Faculty will provide guidelines and resources for students to work within existing projects or to develop their own ideas; community partners will provide networks and planning assistance.  All students will be asked to develop a comprehensive learning portfolio on their semester's work.
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LSP 2470 : Digital Latinxs
Crosslisted as: STS 2470 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
LSP 2721 : Anthropological Representation: Ethnographies of Latino Culture
Crosslisted as: AMST 2721, ANTHR 2721 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Representation is basic to anthropology. In the process of translating societies and cultures, anthropologists produce authoritative accounts about other people, their lives, and their communities. We will here examine, from a critical perspective, the production of representations on Latino culture[s] in anthropological texts. Issues to be explored include the relation between the ethnographer and the people s/he is studying, the contexts in which ethnographic texts are produced, the ways these texts may contribute to the position that different cultural groups have within the United States, and the implications emanating from these processes.
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LSP 2770 : Representing Racial Encounters/Encountering Racial Representations
Crosslisted as: AMST 2770, ASRC 2770, ENGL 2770 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This team-taught course uses literature and popular culture, alongside literary, social, and cultural theory to consider how people from different cultures encounter and experience each other. The course explores travel from multiple perspectives, the concept of dark tourism, and the cultural industry of racial representation. Designed for the general student population, the course specifically appeals to students traveling abroad, or who in the future will work with diverse communities (for example, students with interests in medicine, law, labor, government, business, the hospitality industry, or in the fields of gender, queer, or ethnic studies). The course serves as an introduction to the critical inquiries and scholarly fields of the English department.
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LSP 3010 : Hispanic Theatre Production
Crosslisted as: COML 3010, LATA 3010 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Students develop a specific dramatic text for full-scale production. The course involves selection of an appropriate text, close analysis of the literary aspects of the play, and group evaluation of its representational value and effectiveness. All students in the course are involved in some aspects of production of the play, and write a final paper as a course requirement. Credit is variable depending upon the student's role in play production: a minimum of 50 hours of work is required for 1 credit; a maximum of 3 credits are awarded for 100 hours or more of work.
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LSP 3338 : Border Theory/Border Practice
Crosslisted as: COML 3338, COML 6338, LSP 6338 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
LSP 3402 : Refugees and the Politics of Vulnerability: Intersections of Feminist Theory and Practice
Crosslisted as: AMST 3420, FGSS 3400, GOVT 3401 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
"We're undone by each other. And if we're not, we're missing something," writes Judith Butler in Precarious Life. Can our mutual vulnerability serve as the basis for political intervention and social justice? More specifically, how does a politics of vulnerability help us address the worldwide refugee crisis? How does it limit or preclude an understanding of certain conditions? How might the notion of precarity / precarious lives supplement vulnerability? We will use the growing body of feminist scholarship on vulnerability in law, philosophy, migration studies, and other fields to analyze the refugee crisis in particular locations, including Central American refugees being detained in the U.S. and Syrian refugees fleeing to Europe. We will focus on the intersections of media representation, immigration policy, and activism.
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LSP 3405 : Multicultural Issues in Education
Crosslisted as: AMST 3405, ANTHR 3405, EDUC 3405 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course explores research on race, ethnicity and language in American education. It examines historical and current patterns of school achievement for minoritized youths. It also examines the cultural and social premises undergirding educational practices in diverse communities and schools. Policies, programs and pedagogy, including multicultural and bilingual education, are explored.
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LSP 3470 : Nueva York: Caribbean Urbanisms
Crosslisted as: AMST 3475, ASRC 3470, LATA 3470, SPAN 3470 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
To what extent is New York City part of the Caribbean? This course explores the ways in which writers from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic write New York, whether as tourists, residents, or exiles. We will read about places like Coney Island, Wall Street, Chinatown, Harlem, the Bronx, the Village, the World Trade Center, and Washington Heights. Beginning with the chronicles of José Martí and other Cubans in the late 19th century, we then turn our attention to surrealist visions of catastrophe (1920s & 30s), followed by Nuyorico (1950s), Bronx hip hop (1970s), the gay underground scene (late 1970s & early 80s), 9/11, and the contemporary Dominican diaspora in Upper Manhattan. Topics include exile, nostalgia, transnationalism, imperialism, aesthetics, performance, race, and sexuality.   
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LSP 3980 : Latinx Popular Culture Matters
Crosslisted as: AMST 3981, ENGL 3980 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course analyzes several areas of Latinx popular culture that deeply impacted U.S. politics and history, artistic productions, and aesthetic sensibilities, as well as popular and civic cultures. Mapping a historical trajectory of Chicanidad and Latinidad in art, music, film, and popular media in the twentieth century, the course also engages contemporary practices in art that are rooted in 1960s and 1970s civil rights and community art movements. Topics include Latinx people in film and TV, muralism and street art, music, spoken word as well as close examinations of representations of Latinx people in American mainstream culture.
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LSP 4000 : Contemporary Issues in Latin - Latino America
Crosslisted as: LATA 4000, LATA 6000, LSP 6000 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Interested in Latino Studies and Latin American Studies? This course will explore topics in Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Literature, Government, Sociology, etc., of US Latino and Latin American contexts. Course features guest speakers from Cornell and other institutions.
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LSP 4000 : Contemporary Issues in Latin - Latino America
Crosslisted as: LATA 4000, LATA 6000, LSP 6000 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Interested in Latino Studies and Latin American Studies? This course will explore topics in Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Literature, Government, Sociology, etc., of US Latino and Latin American contexts. Course features guest speakers from Cornell and other institutions.
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LSP 4210 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study.
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LSP 4210 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Guided independent study.
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LSP 4300 : Cultures and Communities
Crosslisted as: LSP 2300 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Conceived as a service-learning course, the centerpiece here is targeted, engaged research and arts work with Latino/a culture-related organizations in Tompkins County like Cultura! No más lágrimas, and the Latino Civic Association. The core idea is that students will learn while participating in meaningful activities that will enhance arts and culture partnerships. Faculty will provide guidelines and resources for students to work within existing projects or to develop their own ideas; community partners will provide networks and planning assistance. All students will be asked to develop a comprehensive learning portfolio on their semester's work.
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LSP 4312 : Migration in the Americas: Engaged Research Methods and Practice
Crosslisted as: COML 4575, COML 6375, DSOC 4312, DSOC 6312, ILRIC 4312, ILRIC 6312, LSP 6312 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to basic concepts and developments related to migrants and migration in Central America, Mexico, and the United States via engaged learning and research. The course will be organized around core themes such as the challenges and ethics of working with vulnerable populations, workplaces and working conditions, oral histories/testimonios, and immigration policy and enforcement practices. Students will learn qualitative methodologies for field research, which they will apply in short projects. This can be taken as a stand-alone course, but it is also a prerequisite for an optional winter intersession practicum.
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LSP 4470 : Data Bodies: Latinx Art and Politics
Crosslisted as: STS 4470 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
LSP 4565 : Traffic: Drugs, Bodies, Books
Crosslisted as: AMST 4565, ENGL 4565, LATA 4565 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
LSP 4578 : The Bodies That Were Not Ours: Visual and Textual Representations of Brown Bodies
Crosslisted as: AMST 4578, ENGL 4578, FGSS 4578, LATA 4578 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course explores representations of brown bodies across literatures and cultural production. Linking historical contexts like sixteenth-century conquest and colonialism with contemporary wars and policies like NAFTA, we will look at art, watch film, and read texts that explore brown, female, and queer bodies and the contemporary intersections of capitalism, transnational labor, gender, and feminism to ask how bodies are constructed. From Alicia Gaspar de Alba's Desert Blood (2005) and Sylvia Moreno-Garcia's Certain Dark Things (2016) to Coco Fusco's performances on institutional violence against women of color, we investigate fantasy and science fictions and the critical turn toward Afro- and Chicana futurisms that figure brown bodies as conduit, as alien, and as cyborg. Addressing interplays between art and consciousness-raising, we examine different modes of representation concerning Latinas, Chicanas, Indigena, and Afro-Latinas in documentary film, photographic essays, poetry, art, and fiction. We ask how such representations participate or intervene in exploitations and if there are alternatives to representing brown bodies as human.
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LSP 4851 : Refugees
Crosslisted as: AMST 4851, HIST 4851, HIST 6851, LSP 6851 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Since World War II, over 4 million people have migrated to the United States as refugees. In this seminar we will examine some of these refugee migrations and the ways these migrations challenged our understanding of the United States as a "haven for the oppressed." We will examine the crafting of refugee/asylum policy, the role of nongovernmental actors in influencing policy, and the ways policy reflected foreign-policy interests and security concerns. The last weeks of the course will pay particular attention to our changing definitions of who 'merits' asylum in the United States since the end of the Cold War.
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LSP 6000 : Contemporary Issues in Latin-Latino America
Crosslisted as: LATA 4000, LATA 6000, LSP 4000 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Interested in Latino Studies and Latin American Studies? This course will explore topics in Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Literature, Government, Sociology, etc., of US Latino and Latin American contexts. Course features guest speakers from Cornell and other institutions.
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Description
LSP 6000 : Contemporary Issues in Latin-Latino America
Crosslisted as: LATA 4000, LATA 6000, LSP 4000 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Interested in Latino Studies and Latin American Studies? This course will explore topics in Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Literature, Government, Sociology, etc., of US Latino and Latin American contexts. Course features guest speakers from Cornell and other institutions.
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LSP 6010 : Crossing Borders: Migrations in Comparative Perspective
Crosslisted as: ILRIC 6010, LATA 6210 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar will examine the links between globalization and migration and explore the character and dimensions of "unauthorized" migration in several regions of the world. Drawing on cases from Europe, Africa, Asia, North America, Latin America, and Australia, we will consider some of the recent theories, debates, and empirical developments relating to such issues as border controls, migration and human rights, development and migration, the role of states, asylum and refugee protection, and politics and citizenship.
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LSP 6110 : Advanced Research in Migration Studies
Crosslisted as: ILRIC 6311 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Students will participate in a winter session practicum, and in this follow-up course will have the opportunity to work closely with faculty on turning their fieldwork results into professional policy papers or academic publications.  As a course with a strong commitment to community engagement, students will also learn how to share their results with the target communities in an effective manner.
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LSP 6210 : Graduate Student Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Guided independent study.
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LSP 6210 : Graduate Student Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study.
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Description
LSP 6312 : Migration in the Americas: Engaged Research Methods and Practice
Crosslisted as: COML 4575, COML 6375, DSOC 4312, DSOC 6312, ILRIC 4312, ILRIC 6312, LSP 4312 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course will introduce students to basic concepts and developments related to migrants and migration in Central America, Mexico, and the United States via engaged learning and research. The course will be organized around core themes such as the challenges and ethics of working with vulnerable populations, workplaces and working conditions, oral histories/testimonios, and immigration policy and enforcement practices. Students will learn qualitative methodologies for field research, which they will apply in short projects. This can be taken as a stand-alone course, but it is also a prerequisite for an optional winter intersession practicum.
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Description
LSP 6338 : Border Theory/Border Practice
Crosslisted as: COML 3338, COML 6338, LSP 3338 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
LSP 6770 : Hispanic Caribbean Rhythms and Aesthetics
Crosslisted as: SPAN 6780 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
LSP 6851 : Refugees
Crosslisted as: AMST 4851, HIST 4851, HIST 6851, LSP 4851 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Since World War II, over 4 million people have migrated to the United States as refugees. In this seminar we will examine some of these refugee migrations and the ways these migrations challenged our understanding of the United States as a "haven for the oppressed." We will examine the crafting of refugee/asylum policy, the role of nongovernmental actors in influencing policy, and the ways policy reflected foreign-policy interests and security concerns. The last weeks of the course will pay particular attention to our changing definitions of who 'merits' asylum in the United States since the end of the Cold War.
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LSP 7352 : Listening from the Other Side: Issues in Music and Border Theory
Crosslisted as: COML 6998, MUSIC 7352 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description