Courses - Spring 2020

LSP 1101 Research Strategies in Africana and Latino Studies

The digital revolution has made an enormous amount of information available to research scholars, but discovering resources and using them effectively can be challenging. This course introduces students with research interests in Latino and Africana Studies to search strategies and methods for finding materials in various formats (e.g., digital, film, and print) using information databases such as the library catalog, print and electronic indexes, and the World Wide Web. Instructors provide equal time for lecture and hands-on learning. Topics include government documents, statistics, subject-specific online databases, social sciences, the humanities, and electronic citation management.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Anthony Cosgrave (ajc5)
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LSP 1105 Race and Ethnicity in the United States: Social Constructs, Real World Consequences

This course will examine race and ethnic relations between Whites, Blacks, Latinos, and Asians in the United States. The goal of this course is for students to understand how the history of race and ethnicity in the U.S. affects opportunity structures in, for example, education, employment, housing, and health. Through this course students will gain a better understanding of how race and ethnicity stratifies the lives of individuals in the U.S.

Distribution: (SBA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Steven Alvarado (sa792)
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LSP 2010 Latinos in the United States

Exploration and analysis of the Hispanic experience in the United States. Examines the sociohistorical background and economic, psychological, and political factors that converge to shape a Latino group identity in the United States. Perspectives are suggested and developed for understanding Hispanic migrations, the plight of Latinos in urban and rural areas, and the unique problems faced by the diverse Latino groups. Groups studied include Mexican Americans, Dominicans, Cubans, and Puerto Ricans.

Distribution: (SBA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Hector Velez (hv13)
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LSP 2251 U.S. Immigration Narratives

Americans are conflicted about immigration. We honor and celebrate (and commercialize) our immigrant heritage in museums, folklife festivals, parades, pageants, and historical monuments. We also build fences and detention centers, and pass more and more laws to bar access to the United States. Polls tell us that Americans are concerned about the capacity of the United States to absorb so many immigrants from around the world. How often have we heard the laments "Today's immigrants are too different. They don't want to assimilate" or "My grandparents learned English quickly, why can't they?" The assumption is that older generations 'Americanized' quickly but that today's immigrants do not want to assimilate. Did 19th century immigrants really migrate to the United States to "become Americans"? Did they really assimilate quickly? Are today's immigrants really all that different from the immigrants who arrived earlier? Why do these particular narratives have such power and currency? This seminar will explore these issues and help students discern fact from fiction. 

Distribution: (HA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Maria Cristina Garcia (mcg20)
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LSP 3065 Immigrant America: Race and Citizenship in Modern Working-Class History

Immigration discourse and policy has played a central role in shaping the modern American nation-state, including its composition, values, and institutions. This course begins in the late nineteenth century, defining it as a pivotal moment in U.S. immigration and labor history when efforts to regulate immigrant entry and naturalization became increasingly bureaucratized. As part of the course we will examine the causes and consequences of working-class migration to the United States from a comparative historical, ethno-racial, class-based, and gendered perspective. We will also address questions regarding the perceived benefit and cost of immigration at both the national and local (i.e., community) levels. In this sense, we will explore the economic, social, cultural, and political impact immigrants have had on the United States over time. Finally, we will consider how immigrants have negotiated the pressures of their new surroundings, and challenged dominant conceptions of American national identity and citizenship in the process.

Distribution: (SBA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Veronica Martinez-Matsuda (vm248)
Full details for LSP 3065 : Immigrant America: Race and Citizenship in Modern Working-Class History
LSP 4000 Contemporary Issues in Latin - Latino America

Interested in Latino Studies and Latin American Studies? This course will explore topics in Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Literature, Government, Sociology, etc., of US Latino and Latin American contexts. Course features guest speakers from Cornell and other institutions.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Debra Castillo (dac9)
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LSP 4210 Undergraduate Independent Study

Guided independent study.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Hector Velez (hv13)
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LSP 4470 Data Bodies: Art and Politics in the Digital Age

Long before the advent of digital platforms such as Facebook, Google, Instagram and Twitter, artists began questioning the growing production and commodification of "data bodies." Groups such as Critical Art Ensemble helped highlight the ways that surveillance, power, new technologies and bodies interacted with one another. This course asks, what shapes do data and bodies take in digital environments? Conversely, how have computing cultures and networks been shaped by data and bodies? What kinds of politics can be performed in such conditions? We use a particular context, the little-discussed practices of Latina/o/x artists as well as their contributions to the history of performance, multimedia art and tactical media since the late-twentieth century, to explore these questions.

Distribution: (LA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Ivan Chaar Lopez (ic349)
Full details for LSP 4470 : Data Bodies: Art and Politics in the Digital Age
LSP 4556 Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Art of/as Resistance in the Americas

Exploring a genealogy of Latinx, Afro-Latinx, Black, Indigenous, and Chicana/o/x theorizations of modernity and identity, the course asks, what is the decolonial? Is it a space between the colonial and post-colonial? Is it a creative process, an intellectual theorization, or a historical period? Is it a performance, intervention, or embodied experience? Tracing a historical trajectory of the decolonial in poetry, performance, installation, and visual art, the course examines decolonial modes of making and being in the early and mid-twentieth century, as well as twenty-first century applications. Artists and authors include Gloria Anzaldúa, Chela Sandoval, Nao Bustamante, Luis Alfaro, Emma Pérez, José Saldívar, Rupert García, Tommy Pico, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Regina José Galindo, James Luna, Adál Maldonado, Coco Fusco, Nelson Maldonado Torres, and many other decolonial producers who are concerned with existence and resistance in the western hemisphere.

Distribution: (LA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Ella Diaz (emd233)
Full details for LSP 4556 : Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Art of/as Resistance in the Americas
LSP 4701 Nightlife

This course explores nightlife as a temporality that fosters countercultural performances of the self and that serves as a site for the emergence of alternative kinship networks.  Focusing on queer communities of color, course participants will be asked to interrogate the ways in which nightlife demonstrates the queer world-making potential that exists beyond the normative 9-5 capitalist model of production. Performances of the everyday, alongside films, texts, and performance art, will be analyzed through a performance studies methodological lens.  Through close readings and sustained cultural analysis, students will acquire a critical understanding of the potentiality of spaces, places, and geographies codified as "after hours" in the development of subcultures, alternative sexualities, and emerging performance practices.

Distribution: (CA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Karen Jaime (kj12)
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LSP 6000 Contemporary Issues in Latin-Latino America

Interested in Latino Studies and Latin American Studies? This course will explore topics in Anthropology, Art, Economics, History, Literature, Government, Sociology, etc., of US Latino and Latin American contexts. Course features guest speakers from Cornell and other institutions.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Debra Castillo (dac9)
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LSP 6110 Advanced Research in Migration Studies

Students will participate in a winter session practicum, and in this follow-up course will have the opportunity to work closely with faculty on turning their fieldwork results into professional policy papers or academic publications.  As a course with a strong commitment to community engagement, students will also learn how to share their results with the target communities in an effective manner.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Debra Castillo (dac9)
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LSP 6210 Graduate Student Independent Study

Guided independent study.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Hector Velez (hv13)
Full details for LSP 6210 : Graduate Student Independent Study
LSP 6565 Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Arts of/as Resistance in the Americas

Exploring a genealogy of Latinx, Afro-Latinx, Black, Indigenous, and Chicana/o/x theorizations of modernity and identity, the course asks, what is the decolonial? Is it a space between the colonial and post-colonial? Is it a creative process, an intellectual theorization, or a historical period? Is it a performance, intervention, or embodied experience? Tracing a historical trajectory of the decolonial in poetry, performance, installation, and visual art, the course examines decolonial modes of making and being in the early and mid-twentieth century, as well as twenty-first century applications. Artists and authors include Gloria Anzaldúa, Chela Sandoval, Nao Bustamante, Luis Alfaro, Emma Pérez, José Saldívar, Rupert García, Tommy Pico, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Regina José Galindo, James Luna, Adál Maldonado, Coco Fusco, Nelson Maldonado Torres, and many other decolonial producers who are concerned with existence and resistance in the western hemisphere.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Ella Diaz (emd233)
Full details for LSP 6565 : Decolonial Poetics and Aesthetics: Arts of/as Resistance in the Americas
LSP 6701 Nightlife

This course explores nightlife as a temporality that fosters countercultural performances of the self and that serves as a site for the emergence of alternative kinship networks.  Focusing on queer communities of color, course participants will be asked to interrogate the ways in which nightlife demonstrates the queer world-making potential that exists beyond the normative 9-5 capitalist model of production. Performances of the everyday, alongside films, texts, and performance art, will be analyzed through a performance studies methodological lens.  Through close readings and sustained cultural analysis, students will acquire a critical understanding of the potentiality of spaces, places, and geographies codified as "after hours" in the development of subcultures, alternative sexualities, and emerging performance practices.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Karen Jaime (kj12)
Full details for LSP 6701 : Nightlife