Academics: “... any person ... any study.”

Latina/o Studies offers a multi-disciplinary range of courses that enhance students’ understanding of Latinas/os in the United States ranging in topics from immigration, labor, politics, music and health to history, culture, law, education, performance and literature. Course offerings are mostly drawn from history, sociology, anthropology, government, literature and performance studies, among others, but the program also cross list courses from other colleges.                                             

Latina/o Studies Program Fridays with Faculty Seminar

Originated in 2004 and currently supported by the College of Arts & Sciences, the Latina/o Studies Program Fridays with Faculty seminar offers an opportunity for Latina/o and non-Latina/o students of all levels and disciplines to meet faculty and administrators from across the university for informal conversation and lunch. The program features speakers with some connection to Latina/o Studies or the Latina/o experience at Cornell and provides a significant alternative academic component for the LSP community. The seminar also serves as a cornerstone retention program as it builds connections and sense of belonging among undergraduate and graduate students, staff and faculty, and increases students' use of Cornell's academic resources. Fall 2021 series

"These Friday lunch seminars provide one of the few spaces that exist where faculty and students - from all schools and all majors - can come together, eat, and have truthful conversations on a variety of topics."

Anthr 2721 course flyer

Fall 2021 Featured Course: ANTHR/AMST/LSP 2721 Anthropological Representations on Latino Culture 

Representation is basic to anthropology. In the process of translating societies and cultures, anthropologists produce authoritative accounts about other people, their lives, and their communities. We will here examine, from a critical perspective, the production of representations on Latino culture[s] in anthropological texts. Issues to be explored include the relation between the ethnographer and the people s/he is studying, the contexts in which ethnographic texts are produced, the ways these texts may contribute to the position that different cultural groups have within the United States, and the implications emanating from these processes.

Instructor: Vilma Santiago-Irizarry • Tuesday/Thursday 2:45-4:00pm • 3 credits • In person instruction